Sexual Health Dangers: Is Anal Sex Good for You?

Last modified: August 2, 2019

Richard Honaker M.D.
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Anal sex may arise as a discussion topic in your bedroom, and knowing the dangers associated with anal is important for Women’s Health and Sexual Health. Here’s why!

Some research may have stated that anal sex is not as common as pop culture might suggest, but a 2016 study have discovered that 12.2 percent of American women had done anal sex within the past three months. It can clearly be inferred that curiosity about anal sex has definitely increased.

Since it’s not the traditional way of copulating, there are some who are still hesitant on trying it because of their fear of pain and of what sexual health dangers they may have to face. The following will help things become clearer.

Anal Sex Dangers

What are the Sexual Health Dangers of Anal Sex?

According to a female expert on sexual medicine, it is necessary for women to know about the sexual health risks and dangers involved with anal sex.

First and foremost, before thinking of any sexual health dangers, be reminded that the anus is supposed to be a one-way passage. It was not made for coitus unlike the vagina.

The vagina is elastic and has a lining that’s made to extend and adjust to a penis or a baby. Rectal tissue, on the other hand, is thinner and not elastic at all. Therefore, there will be a higher chance that it can tear. And tearing triggers more dangers of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

Some of the possible sexual health infections that you might contract are rectal gonorrhea, anal chlamydia, and HIV. As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), anal sex is the sexual health behaviour that has the highest dangers of HIV infections.

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Anal Sex Increases Your Risk for HPV

Anal sex is also most likely to transfer the human papillomavirus (HPV). A very little number of heterosexual men have HIV, while more than half of men have HPV. HPV is an origin of anal warts and anal cancer.

Getting screened for anal STIs at your doctor’s office is also highly unusual unless the doctor particularly asks if you’re having anal sex or you specifically asked for those tests.

So you can’t easily know who has HPV since the person himself might not know it. Because of such, this particular infection is more likely to spread and pose more sexual health dangers for unsuspecting partners.

More of the sexual health dangers of anal sex include pain, bleeding, and fecal incontinence. There’s also a new research from Northwestern University that revealed that women who made anal sex a regular part of their intimate sessions were more inclined to say that it changed the consistency of their feces, and also reported both urinary and fecal incontinence.

Most people are unaware of this bit of information. Will these particular sexual health dangers discourage people? Maybe or maybe not.

How to have Anal Sex Safely

What’s the safest way for those who are still interested in trying anal sex despite knowing the sexual health dangers? Experts’ advice is to use protection even if you’re in a monogamous relationship.

Always use condoms for anal sex. If you will have vaginal sex after anal sex, ask your partner to put on a new condom to avoid the sexual health dangers of contracting a urinary tract infection.

Do you have sexual health questions of any kind you are too embarrassed to ask your primary physician? Now you can talk to a doctor online for free with YDO. Simply click the button below and connect with our panel of North American doctors in minutes. 

Submitted by Dr. Richard Honaker: http://www.independentmedicalexaminer.com/IME-Directory/Virginia/Dr-Richard-A-Honaker-MD.asp

Disclaimer: This article provides general information and is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any disease or medical condition. If you require specific advice, please consult one of our medical professionals through the app. However, in case of an emergency, please call 911.

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